TRAPPIST MISSIONS

TRAPPIST MISSIONS

Abbot Francis Pfanner
Abbot Francis Pfanner

Mariannhill Monastery

 

When Abbot Francis Pfanner arrived in South Africa in 1880 no-one could have anticipated the controversies he would unleash, nor the impact his work would have. He established the Mariannhill Monastery and a string of outstations. Pfanner belonged to the Trappist order and was under an oath of silence. However, he believed his task from God was to respond to the needs of the communities around him. How could he teach, evangelize and heal without interaction with the people?  

 

Soaring spires and spectacular scenery

 

Follow the pioneering footsteps of Abbot Francis Pfanner from Mariannhill to beautiful mission churches in the foothills of the Drakensberg. There friendly communities demonstrate Pfanner’s lasting contribution to social upliftment, education and Christian faith. Missions now provide homes for orphans, schooling, hospitals and pastoral care. Your visit will help them to continue their good work. 

Mariannhill Monastery

 

When Abbot Francis Pfanner arrived in South Africa in 1880 no-one could have anticipated the controversies he would unleash, nor the impact his work would have. He established the Mariannhill Monastery and a string of outstations. Pfanner belonged to the Trappist order and was under an oath of silence. However, he believed his task from God was to respond to the needs of the communities around him. How could he teach, evangelize and heal without interaction with the people?  

 

Soaring spires and spectacular scenery

 

Follow the pioneering footsteps of Abbot Francis Pfanner from Mariannhill to beautiful mission churches in the foothills of the Drakensberg. There friendly communities demonstrate Pfanner’s lasting contribution to social upliftment, education and Christian faith. Missions now provide homes for orphans, schooling, hospitals and pastoral care. Your visit will help them to continue their good work. 

Abbot Francis Pfanner
Abbot Francis Pfanner

Stations of the Cross

 

But Pfanner’s flouting of strict Trappist rules led to his being sent into lonely exile to a remote part Natal, where he died. This distant mission station allows visitors to climb up the steep stairs that Pfanner built, past the twelve Stations of the Cross to the silver statue of the crucified Christ that looks down onto the graveyard where Pfanner’s heart was buried before his body was taken to Mariannhill.

The tour is not linked to any religious doctrine, but is an appreciation of a rich cultural heritage and the tensions that arose between Trappist tradition and untamed Africa.

 

Architecture

 

People with an interest in history, architecture, art, stained glass and scenery will love this tour. It traverses the achingly beautiful country made famous in Alan Paton’s book “Cry the Beloved Country.”

Stations of the cross at Emmaus Mission
Stations of the cross at Emmaus Mission

Francis Pfanner may shortly be proclaimed a saint, so now is the time to celebrate this incredible man’s life and the contribution he made to the historical and social legacy of KwaZulu-Natal. 

 

Duration:  2 to 5 days

Accommodation: Tranquil, working missions or comfortable guest houses.

Prices: To suit your pocket and depending on accommodation choice.

Distance covered:  From Durban about 600 km over duration of tour. Roads mostly tar with some gravel sections. 

For more information please contact nicki@campaigntrails.co.za

Tour at Centocow Trappist Mission
Mission Tour at Centocow Mission Museum
St Isidore church Kings Grant
St Isidore Church at Kings Grant
Kevelaer Mission Church Donnybrook
Church at Kevelaer Mission
Abbot Francis Pfanners house at Emmaus Mission
Abbot Pfanners house at Emmaus Mission